Office 2.0 is not…

Stowe Boyde writes an interesting post listing three things that Office 2.0 is NOT.

  • It’s not about productivity — personally, I’m willing to swap productivity for connectedness everytime. As a result, I keep my IM clients open even in meetings, while I am on the phone, and while working on client work.
  • It’s not about being “dead easy” — some things are necessarily complex, and if you try to simplify them you wind up with something that is unusable: for example, textile is easy but leads to badly formatted text.
  • It’s not about better knowledge management — social apps allow us to learn what others think, but not manage what they think.

Ultimately most things boil down to conversations. I stumbled across this interesting looking book, The Cluetrain Manifesto. Chapter 4, Markets are Conversations, is published on the web – it’s quite long and I haven’t read the whole thing yet.

Conversation is a profound act of humanity.

You’ve done testing IE7, right?

Microsoft are set to release IE7 with next months batch of critical updates, and sooner for manual download. That means that some of your clients may be using IE7 to access our external services. The link has some tools and tips on the what and how to be prepared.

Scott Hanselman blogs here about the way IE7 treats certificates.

Level your podcasts

One thing I really hate, when listening to podcasts, is people or items coming through at different volumes levels; especially in interviews. Enter the Levelator from GigaVox. A free (for non-commercial use) utility that analyses the levels across the audio stream, building a “loudness map” and leveling the volume over multiple passes. I heard of it on a podcast, which was recorded on a stage and even before it was mentioned I had noticed how consistent the level was.

Attention data

Putting something like this together with the InfoCard (see Kim Cameron’s blog) would be a wonderful way to manage access to attention data. You could even manage different attention profiles that you make available to different sites.

/Message: APML – Attention Profiling Mark-up Language

A new draft standard for an APML – Attention Profiling Mark-up Language has been proposed

Finally some light… RSS reader on Vista

UPDATE [Sept ’07]: I am the Infrastructure Architect for a 9000+ organisation. We finally deployed RSS Bandit and RSS Feeds are being created on the Intranet and in applications. The picture is far from complete as I attempt to build out capabilities in the Social Software space and pitch these into the existing technology ecosystem. For the last year all my blogging has been internal, but I’ve recently started putting some thoughts back out into the public arena. If your struggle reflects mine you might find my new blog of interest.

It looks like perhaps the RSS functionality I was hoping would come with Vista to replace my tatical current choice of RSS Bandit may be in the offering. I had feared that MS would invest all their effort into making Outlook the reader client of choice, which kind of excludes those firms that don’t use Exchange.

Techcrunch » Blog Archive » Microsoft Launches Desktop Feed Reader

If these tools are bundled in with Vista, and we assume they will be, PC-based desktop aggregators like those offered by Newsgator are going to be in a very tough position competitively.

UPDATE: Max turns out to be a dud – Finally tried Max.

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Downgrading Enterprise 2.0

Richard Young writes to the Enterprise 2.0 concept in an article titled Enterprise 1.6. I especially like the article by Tom Davenport to which he refers.

Social media in the enterprise

Following on from my thinking on RSS Enabling the Enterprise, I have been pondering on how much CIOs really want this technology. This article has a good discussion and throws some water on the fire.

Enterprise Web 2.0 » Why CEOs Are Afraid of Social Media

It’s merely one more example of why the Enterprise 2.0 revolution is not about technology, it’s about who gets to control the flow and pace of inside information.